Russia Issues Dark Warning To Ukraine Against Eu Trade And Cooperation Deal

Saying 40 percent of Ukrainians had doubts over the agreements with the EU, Glazyev, who has made hawkish comments before about Ukraine’s pro-Europe policy, urged the Kiev government to ballot its people. “Let us … ask the Ukrainian people what choice they prefer,” he said. TYMOSHENKO RELEASE Azarov had sharp words for Russia over its refusal to cut the price of its gas, which hangs heavy on Ukraine’s cash-strapped economy. Ukraine pays what it sees as an exorbitant $400 per thousand cubic meters under a 2009 contract, which Russia has refused to redraw. In a bid to break away from reliance on Russia, Ukraine hopes to find alternative energy sources through shale gas exploration and imports from other sources. Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich on Friday reiterated that Kiev was committed to signing the agreements with the EU at a November 28 summit in Vilnius, Lithuania, marking a pivotal shift away from Russia. But he refused to say whether he would free his jailed political rival, former prime minister Yulia Tymoshenko, who the EU says is a victim of ‘selective justice’. Tymoshenko was sentenced to seven years in jail in 2011 for abuse of office after a trial that she says was a vendetta by Yanukovich. Former Polish president Aleksander Kwasniewski, who is involved in mediation missions on behalf of the EU to get Tymoshenko released, urged Yanukovich to free her for medical treatment in Germany. “She is ill. She needs surgery. She needs therapy and rehabilitation,” he said at the conference.

Germany vs. Russia: Key Players to Watch in Women’s World Cup Qualifying

Yacoub Two suicide bombers hit funeral tents packed with mourners in Baghdad, the deadliest in a string of attacks. Will Englund A momentous choice between East and West faces Ukraine in its pending trade agreement with the E.U. Krishan Francis Ethnic Tamils in Sri Lankas war-ravaged north voted Saturday to form a provincial government. Who will pay for Ukraines default, which will become inevitable? Glazyev asked. One has to be ready to pay for that. Russia is opposing Kievs plans to sign a free-trade and political association agreement with the 28-member bloc in November, seeking instead to lure Kiev into a Moscow-led economic union. It upped the pressure on Ukraine over the summer by banning the products of a major confectionary maker in Russia and by temporarily halting some Ukrainian imports at its border, dealing a painful blow to Ukrainian business. Former Economy Minister and confectionary magnate Petro Poroshenko lashed out at Russia for banning his products from Russian stores in order to exert political pressure on Ukraine, saying Moscow had previously resorted to similar tactics when dealing with other dissenting former Soviet republics. I am 100 percent sure that nobody either in this forum, nor in the world, would strongly believe that Georgian mineral water or Moldovan wine or Ukrainian chocolate or Lithuanian cheese or Belarusian milk products are really harmful for the health of the Russian consumer. This is simply not true, Poroshenko said. EU officials have urged Kiev to implement key reforms and sign the EU deal in November, saying Ukraine belongs with the West. The key obstacle to the deal is the incarceration of former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, whose verdict the West has condemned as politically motivated and is pressing hard for her to be released in order for the deal to be signed. Polish Foreign Minister Radoslaw Sikorski exhorted Ukraine to resist the Kremlin pressure and sign the agreement in November, citing Polands success in joining the bloc. Weve done it, so can you, Sikorski said.

epa03871453 A rescue worker climbs across a line to help trapped people in Chailpanchingo, Mexico, 17 September 2013. According to media reports, Hurricane Ingrid was downgraded to a tropical storm but continued to pour heavy rain over eastern Mexico, where it killed at least 34 people.  EPA/LENIN OCAMPO TORRES

The law prohibits the distribution of information to minors that promotes same-sex relationships. Critics say it infringes gay rights and are worried that spectators waving rainbow flags or wearing rainbow T-shirts could be arrested at the Games. Major sponsors such as Coca-Cola ( CCE , Fortune 500 ) and McDonald’s ( MCD , Fortune 500 ) are concerned about the risk of high-profile protests at the Games. Such demonstrations may draw attention to them for the wrong reasons and fuel calls for a boycott of their products. President Vladimir Putin signed the law in June, sparking global outrage and a wave of protests demanding a boycott of the Games, which will be held in the Black Sea resort town of Sochi in February. There’s no sign of athletes staying away but others big names are distancing themselves from the event. Just this week pop singer Cher said she had refused an invitation to perform because of Russia’s anti-gay stance. Related: Bars worldwide boycott Russian vodka over anti-gay laws Putin said in an interview on state television in September that gay people would not be discriminated against at the Sochi Games. But that appears at odds with statements made by government officials that the anti-gay propaganda law will be enforced. The legislation gives authorities the power to impose fines as well as detain foreigners who are deemed to have breached the law before deporting them. Four Dutch tourists reportedly making a film about gay rights in Russia were arrested under the law in July. The other big Olympic sponsors are Visa ( V , Fortune 500 ), Samsung ( SSNLF ), Panasonic ( PCRFF ), General Electric ( GE , Fortune 500 ), Dow Chemical ( DOW , Fortune 500 ), Procter & Gamble ( PG , Fortune 500 ), Omega ( OCFN ) and Atos ( ATOS ). They’re staying tight-lipped about the issue in public but a senior official at the International Olympic Committee said this month that several had raised concerns about how the law could affect the Games.

Russia’s anti-gay law could hit Olympic sponsors

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The hostsface tough opposition in a Russia side who were defeated just once in three games at the European Championship as they continue their steady progression. Who, then, are the players to watch out for? Dzsenifer Marozsan, Attacking Midfielder, Germany Martin Rose/Getty Images Germany have had some great attacking midfielders in recent years and, at just 21, DzseniferMarozsan appears as though she could eventually also reach those levels. The Hungarian-born midfielder won the Golden Ball award for best player at the 2012 U20 World Cup, per Soccer America , and has already made a good start to her senior career, scoring the goal that took Germany into the European Championship final. Just 5’7″ tall, the diminutive playmaker has great balance and footwork with which she looks to unlock defences. Marozsan could be a real star in women’s football in the coming years. Celia Okoyino da Mbabi, Striker, Germany German Footballer of the Year in 2012,CeliaOkoyino da Mbabi already has 43 international goals at the age of 27 and is well on her way to writing her name into the country’s footballing history. Okoyino da Mbabi scored a remarkable 17 goals in just 10 matches to help Germany qualify for the European Championship this summer and, while she scored just twice at the tournament, she remains the side’s main attacking threat. Martin Rose/Getty Images A transfer to FFC Frankfurt this summer saw the forward move from her long-time club Bad Neuenahr and the hope will be that she can quickly pick up the form of the past couple of years. Nelli Korovkina, Forward, Russia Ismailovo forward NelliKorovkina scored four times in six appearances during the European Championship campaign, including qualifying, to establish herself as one of the young stars of Russian football. Now 24 years old, Korovkina’s standout performance of the Euros came against England where she scored a header and also threatened to add a second with a wonderful curled shot that flew narrowly wide of the goal. Technically gifted and quick across the ground, she can cause the German defence problems if given the opportunity. Elena Terekhova, Centre Midfield, Russia EuroFootball/Getty Images Ryazan midfielder ElenaTerekhova is a key member of the Russian side, occupying a box-to-box role in midfield. Her experience and composure will be important assets if her side are to get anything from this encounter. With nearly 50 caps to her name, Russia will look to the 26-year-old in a match that is likely to see them come under intense pressure from the hosts.